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The complete history of every Imperial Roman legion and what it achieved as a fighting force, by an award-winning historian. In this landmark publication, Stephen Dando-Collins does what no other author has ever attempted to do: provide a complete history of every Imperial Roman legion. Based on thirty years of meticulous research, he covers every legion of Rome in rich detail. In the first part of the book, the author provides a detailed account of what the legionaries wore and ate, what camp life was like, what they were paid, and how they were motivated and punished.

Part two examines the histories of all the legions that served Rome for three hundred years starting in 30 BC. The book's final section is a sweeping chronological survey of the campaigns in which the armies were involved, told from the point of view of the legions. Featuring more than maps, photographs, diagrams and battle plans, Legions of Rome is an essential read for ancient history enthusiasts, military history experts and general readers alike. Help Centre. My Wishlist Sign In Join. Be the first to write a review. Add to Wishlist. Ships in 7 to 10 business days.

Organization of the Roman Imperial Legion | imenbityro.cf

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The complete history of every Imperial Roman legion and what it achieved as a fighting force, by an award-winning historian In this landmark publication, Stephen Dando-Collins does what no other author has ever attempted to do: provide a complete history of every Imperial Roman legion. Centurions : Each Legion had 59 or 60 centurions, one to command each centuria of the 10 cohorts. They were the backbone of the professional army and were the career soldiers who ran the day to day life of the soldiers as well as issuing commands in the field.

They were generally moved up from the ranks, but in some cases could be direct appointments from the Emperor or other higher ranking officials. The cohorts were ranked from the First to the Tenth and the Centuria within each cohort ranked from 1 to 6, with only 5 Centuria in the First Cohort For a total of 59 Centuria and the Primus Pilus. The Centuria that each Centurion commanded was a direct reflection of his rank.

Command of the First Centuria of the First Cohort was the highest and the 6th Centuria of the 10th Cohort was the lowest. Pilus Prior : The commander of the first cohort of each Centuria except the first , with the following titles for the Centurions in sequence throughout each Centuria.

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The following chart identifies the centurion command structure of each century, cohort and legion, including their typical battle arrangement with strongest from right to left. The bracketed name in each column signifies the actual title of that officer.

For example: the Quintus Princeps Posterior was the commander of the 4th century of the 5th cohort. Aquilifer : A single position within the Legion. The Aquilifer was the Legion's Standard or Eagle bearer and was an enormously important and prestigious position. The next step up would be a post as a Centurion. Signifer : Each Centuria had a Signifer He was responsible for the men's pay and savings, and the standard bearer for the Centurial Signum, a spear shaft decorated with medallions and often topped with an open hand to signify the oath of loyalty taken by the soldiers.

It was this banner that the men from each individual Centuria would rally around. A soldier could also gain the position of Discentes signiferorum, or standard bearer in training. Optio : One for each Centurion 59 , they were appointed by the Centurion from within the ranks to act as his second in command. Tesserarius : Guard Commander Again there were 59 of these, or one for each Centuria.

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They acted in similar roles to the Optios. Cornicen : Horn blower They worked hand in hand with the Signifer drawing the attention of the men to the Centurial Signum and issuing the audible commands of the officers. Imaginifer : Carried the Standard bearing the image of the Emperor as a constant reminder of the troop's loyalty to him. Immunes : These were trained specialists, such as surgeons, engineers, surveyors, and architects, as well as craftsmen. They were exempt from camp and hard labor duties due to the nature of their work, and would generally earn slightly more pay than the Milites.

Munifex or Miles Gregarius : The basic private level foot soldier. Tirones : The basic new recruit. A Tirones could take up to 6 months before becoming a full Milites.

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Enjoyed UNRV. Every monthly subscription or any one-off donation will help cover the costs of running and maintaining the site. In this landmark publication, Stephen Dando-Collins does what no other author has ever attempted to do: provide a complete history of every Imperial Roman legion.

The Roman Legion

Based on thirty years of meticulous research, he covers every legion of Rome in rich detail. Featuring more than maps, photographs, diagrams and battle plans, Legions of Rome is an essential read for ancient history enthusiasts, military history experts and general readers alike. Visit the sections below to find out more information regarding the legions of Ancient Rome.

Organization of the Roman Imperial Legion A full strength legion was officially made up of 6, men, but typically all legions were organized at under strength and generally consisted of approximately 5, fighting men including officers. The basic structure of the army is as follows: Contubernium : tent group consisted of 8 men. Legio : Legion consisted of 10 cohorts.

Legions of Rome : the definitive history of every Imperial Roman legion

Therefore the total fighting strength of a Legion: The First Cohort totaling men 5 double-strength centuries with men each 9 Cohorts with 6 centuries at 80 men each for a total 4,, and an additional man cavalry for a grand total of 5, men not including all the officers. Cohort II : Consisted of some of the weaker or newest troops. Cohort III : No special designation for this unit.

Cohort IV : Another of the four weak cohorts.